Location: Radiography

Discussion: Radiation protectionReported This is a featured thread

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aqdem
aqdem
Radiation protection
Apr 14 2011, 6:39 AM EDT | Post edited: Apr 14 2011, 6:39 AM EDT
Is it possible that 125 KV X Rays can pas through 300 mm concrete slab ?
The X Ray room is on 1st floor and X Ray camara is positioned on table
There is a waiting room on Ground floor dose these radeation will effect the
person in the waiting room

take good care of your self that is most Important
regards
Baig
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mrenfinger
mrenfinger
1. RE: Radiation protection
May 7 2011, 5:54 AM EDT | Post edited: May 7 2011, 5:54 AM EDT
"Is it possible that 125 KV X Rays can pas through 300 mm concrete slab ?
The X Ray room is on 1st floor and X Ray camara is positioned on table
There is a waiting room on Ground floor dose these radeation will effect the
person in the waiting room

"
It is highly unlikely that this would penetrate the slab, even if pointed directly toward it. Remember, most of the radiation interacting with the slab will be scatter radiation, which is far less penetrating that the primary beam... I don't think you have anything to worry about.
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eliseleblanc
eliseleblanc
2. RE: Radiation protection
May 10 2011, 8:55 PM EDT | Post edited: May 10 2011, 8:55 PM EDT
Hi,

At 125 kV, the half value layer (HVL) of concrete is 2 cm. This means half of the photons from the incident beam are absorbed in 2cm of concrete. Add another 2 cm, and it is reduced to 25%, etc...

HVL=.693/μ
μ=0.693/HVL
μ=0.693/2cm
μ=0.346

Using the intensity attenuation equation, I=(Io)e^(-μx),

Assuming the incident beam is 100%... and 30 cm concrete slab...

I=(Io)e^(-μx)
I=100%e^(-0.346*30)
I=0.003%

So, the 30cm concrete slab reduces the intensity of the beam to 0.003% of the incident beam.

Also, if you refer to a reference like the NCRP report #49 you will see that the 300mm concrete slab exceeds the requirements.

You should check out Health Canada's Safety Code 35: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ewh-semt/pubs/radiation/safety-code_35-securite/index-eng.php (especially pages 61-66).

Conclusion: The dose to the person in the waiting room below is negligible.
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